TRACKTOWN 2012 - HAYWARD FIELD
Official Site for the 2012 US Olympic Trials  - Track & Field  June 21 - July 1, 2012

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Camas' spectacular Alexa Efraimson faces decision; Cameron Scarlett has Oregon Ducks on short list: The Oregonian sports top 5

Published Jan 01, 0001

These five stories were most read on Tuesday.

In case you missed them, these five Oregonian sports stories proved most popular with readers on Tuesday, July 22 (as of 11 p.m.). The gallery above was the day's most popular.

1. Four-star running back has Oregon on his top 5 list, CJ McCollum leaves Vegas with signs of improvement : The Oregonian sports top 5

2. Bill Bowerman's daughter-in-law out as Condon/Wheeler track coach after taking student to prom

3. Canzano: Does the Baylor QB register at a Salem Dairy Queen or not?

4. Camas' spectacular Alexa Efraimson plans to forgo her senior season; next up: Oregon, Stanford or turn professional?

5. Central Catholic four-star running back Cameron Scarlett includes Oregon in list of top 5 schools

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There were fireworks in the women's 100 qualifying at the World Junior Track & Field Championships

Published Jan 01, 0001

Ecuadorian sprinter Angela Tenorio credits the crowd after making good on a second chance.

EUGENE – Medal favorites Kaylin Whitney, Dina Asher-Smith and Ariana Washington cruised through the first round of women's 100-meter qualifying in the IAAF World Junior Track & Field Championships on a muggy evening at Hayward Field.

Asher-Smith, who clocked the fourth-fastest time ever by a British woman earlier this month, was the day's top qualifier in 11.18 seconds.

The 16-year-old Whitney, who set the U.S. junior record while winning the USA Junior title a few weeks ago at Hayward Field, overcame a slow start to finish first in her heat.

Ditto for Washington who will run for Oregon in the fall after sweeping the California state high school championships 100 and 200 for three consecutive seasons.

None of the three over-extended themselves, with the semifinals and finals looming on Wednesday.

"I definitely tried to save gas because I have to run twice tomorrow," Washington said.

A crowd that totaled 6,852 for the meet's first two sessions turned out on a muggy day that began with rain showers and changed to afternoon sunshine.

It wasn't without controversy. Ecuadorian sprinter Angela Tenorio was disqualified for a false start that was not apparent in replays.

After a review of the video, Tenorio was allowed to re-run the 100 by herself after Tuesday's last scheduled event.

Much of the crowd stuck around for Tenorio's solo effort, which itself was delayed by technical problems. No matter. With the crowd cheering her on, she burned to a time of 11.27, the day's second fastest overall qualifying time.

"The crowd is incredible," Tenorio said through an interpreter. "What I felt here I've never felt anywhere else. They supported me and I'm not an American athlete. I had the undivided support of the crowd."

Oregon-bound heptathlete Ashlee Moore stands 11th after the first day of the seven-event competition with 3,331 points.

Morgan Lake of Britain leads the heptathlon with 3,821 points, a first-day performance highlighted by a clearance in the high jump of 6 feet 4 ¼ inches.

The mark is a British junior record, and the all-time best for a junior heptathlete of any nationality.

"I was quite surprised when that happened," she said.

Moore was upbeat, even after struggling in the shot. Her mark of 32-4 ¾ was 23rd of the 24 athletes in the competition.

"I kind of lost my momentum in the shot put," she said. "But it's not my best event. But I'm just excited to be here – happy and excited for the next day."

Fellow Team USA heptathlete Shaina Burns was disqualified for stepping on a line in her heat of the 200, although she didn't know it until a reporter told her in the mixed zone.

In the TrackTown USA/Register-Guard form chart for the women's 100, Whitney is picked to win, followed by Asher-Smith and Washington. They all appear on schedule, and determined to take it one race at a time.

Whitney's goal?

"Just win my heat and make sure not to exert too much energy," said Whitney, who flashed to an 11.10 at the USA Juniors and was timed in 11.48 on Tuesday. "Save it all for the final."

The final could be epic. Asher-Smith said she didn't go all out on Tuesday.

"I ran 11.18 with a little bit more to give," she said. "I'm shocked."

And happy with the Hayward track.

"It's really, really fast," Asher-Smith said. "It's much faster here than what we can do in Europe."

She will run into Whitney in the process.

"She's amazing," Asher-Smith said, drawing out the word.

In the men's 10,000, the only final on the first day, Ugandan Joshua Cheptegei won in 28:32.86.

Here are complete results from the meet's first day of competition.

-- Ken Goe | @KenGoe

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It's a concert at the track, as runners, band ensemble make music in 10K final: IAAF World Junior Championships 2014

Published Jan 01, 0001

Oregon music professor Brian McWhorter writes and conducts a 30-minute piece specifically for Tuesday's 10,000-meter race

brian-mcwhorter_credit-glen-waddell-5web.jpgUO music professor Brian McWhorter had less than a month to write a 30-minute piece of music that was played Tuesday night during the men's 10,000-meter final. 

EUGENE – The first final of the 2014 IAAF World Junior Championships ended as most track races do: one person runs a little faster than the rest and wins the race.

So it was Tuesday night when Uganda's Joshua Kiprui Cheptegei won the men's 10,000 meters.

During the running of the race? Now that was a little different. It was a dream seeded about a month ago, when TrackTown USA president Vin Lananna approached Brian McWhorter with a unique assignment.

In what is believed to be a first, McWhorter and the 20-person University of Oregon Brass and Percussion Ensemble played live music during the 29-minute race, a piece specifically written to mesh with the running of the 10K.

McWhorter, an associate professor in Oregon's School of Music and Dance, composed the piece. There were no specific mandates, other than, according to McWhorter, "make it cool, unique and kind of fun."

No pressure there.

It was not an assignment McWhorter willingly embraced when he was first asked. He had a few issues.

First, there was time. Write a 30-minute piece on three weeks notice, for something that hadn't been done before? That really didn't bother McWhorter as much as the music becoming the focus of the 10K rather than the competitors.

"I want to feel like the racing is what's happening," McWhorter said. "Ultimately, it came down to, could I write something that would add to the mood without it being so charged so as to elicit negative reaction?"

Who better to review the work than the runners themselves?

"It was awesome," said USA's Brendan Shearn, who finished 15th. "They kept a good rythym. It helped you keep your mind off the pain a little."

Another American runner, Jonathan Green, sort of gave the music a shoulder shrug.

"It was good, but to be honest, I was listening more to the USA (teammates) in the stands cheering me on," Green said.

Why McWhorter, 39, as composer/mastermind of this project? Others were consulted, but in the end, McWhorter said assignments like this are in his wheelhouse.

"I guess I'm known for pulling off huge, unruly projects like this in a fairly short order of time," he said.

With no precedent to fall back on, McWhorter went to work researching the flow and rhythm of 10K races, going back as far as the Steve Prefontaine era. It became a work of love for McWhorter, a former sprinter at David Douglas High School who says track "is probably the sport I'm most interested in. I like to see what a human body can do."

In the end, McWhorter decided to focus his musical piece on a Hayward Field tradition, where fans clap in unison as the lead runners pass by the main grandstand during each lap.

"It's a Roman Coliseum-esque kind of thing. There's a percussion thing as the runners roll along, and it's constantly speeding up. The whole time, it's about speeding up," McWhorter said.

That is how it played out. The music was soft and mellow while the lead runners were on the backstretch, but as they approached the Bowerman Curve, the drum beat, along with other instruments, dramatically picked up in tempo and intensity.

Then, once the runners passed the finish line, the music returned to a near-whisper. Three-hundred meters later, back to a pulsating sound. Over and over, for 25 laps, though each lap finished up with a slightly different beat and sound.

It was the first try at track meet musical. At least one runner hopes it's not the last.

"It was really a great thing they tried. Hope it's something they continue throughout the sport," Shearn said.

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Uganda's Cheptegei wins the men's 10,000-meter final: IAAF World Junior Championships 2014

Published Jan 01, 0001

EUGENE – Uganda's Joshua Kiprui Cheptegei pulled away during the final lap to win the men's 10,000 meters Tuesday night at the 2014 IAAF World Junior Championships at Hayward Field. Cheptegei took the lead with about 3,000 meters remaining, winning the race in a time of 28 minutes, 32.86 seconds. Kenya's Elvis Kipchoge Cheboi was second, his time 28.35.20....

EUGENE – Uganda's Joshua Kiprui Cheptegei pulled away during the final lap to win the men's 10,000 meters Tuesday night at the 2014 IAAF World Junior Championships at Hayward Field.

Cheptegei took the lead with about 3,000 meters remaining, winning the race in a time of 28 minutes, 32.86 seconds. Kenya's Elvis Kipchoge Cheboi was second, his time 28.35.20. Another Kenyan, Nicholas Mboroto Kosimbei, took the bronze medal.

The top American was Brendan Shearn, who placed 15th.

Here are results of the men's 10K. Read more...

Australia's Cedric Dubler grabs the first-day lead in decathlon: IAAF World Junior Championships 2014

Published Jan 01, 0001

EUGENE – Cedric Dubler of Australia claimed the decathlon lead following the first day of competition Tuesday in the IAAF World Junior Track & Field Championships at Hayward Field. Dubler rallied to take the lead on the fifth and final event of the day with a fifth-place finish in the 400. Dubler has 4,329 points, 48 ahead of second-place...

EUGENE – Cedric Dubler of Australia claimed the decathlon lead following the first day of competition Tuesday in the IAAF World Junior Track & Field Championships at Hayward Field.

Dubler rallied to take the lead on the fifth and final event of the day with a fifth-place finish in the 400. Dubler has 4,329 points, 48 ahead of second-place Evgeniy Likhanov of Russia.

The top USA competitor is Harrison Williams, who is 10th with 4,032 points.

Here are the first-day results.

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